Giving Thanks for Jaguars

A wallpaper for International Jaguar Day 2020
Image courtesy of the WCS and Jaguar USA.

While I have mixed feelings about the Thanksgiving holiday for reasons that NPR’s Piper McDaniel explains, my feelings about jaguars are 100% clear: I like them.

More specifically, I’m thankful to live on a planet with so many extraordinary animals – including jaguars – and that there are people working hard to conserve them.

This year, I’m especially thankful to Jaguar USA and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) for teaming up to raise money for jaguars on International Jaguar Day.

International Jaguar Day takes place every year on November 29. Its purpose is to raise support for jaguar conservation, and to teach people about the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere.

A jaguar walking past a camera trap. Video courtesy of Jaguar USA and the WCS.

While jaguars have fared better than some big cats, their future is still uncertain. They’ve lost around half of their historical range, are under pressure from threats such as habitat loss and conflict with people, and have recently become a target for the traditional Asian medicine trade.

That’s why I’m thankful that the WCS and Jaguar USA have announced a massive fundraiser for this year’s International Jaguar Day.

Both companies will be raising awareness about jaguars on International Jaguar Day and on Giving Tuesday (Dec. 1), and urging their followers to donate to jaguar conservation.

Based out of New York City, the WCS is one of the world’s most respected conservation non-profits. They have projects all over the world, helping to conserve a staggering range of species and ecosystems, and have long been major advocates for jaguars and the people who live alongside them.

The WCS’ efforts are paying off: jaguar populations are increasing by an average of 6.1% per year within their project areas.

Crucially, the WCS is also working to restore jaguar numbers and habitat connectivity within the Southwest Borderlands.

Jaguar USA, on the other hand, is the North American branch of the jaguar car company. Jaguar has long supported the conservation of their feline namesake, sponsoring international jaguar conferences and other projects, and I’m happy to see that Jaguar is continuing their legacy of corporate responsibility.

A recent post from Jaguar USA about their partnership with the WCS.

To participate in the WCS’ and Jaguar USA’s joint fundraiser, you have two options:

  1. Donate now on the WCS’ website.
  2. Follow the WCS and Jaguar North America on social media.
    1. Both companies will put out calls to action on Giving Tuesday.
    2. To save you time, here are the Instagram profiles for the WCS and Jaguar USA.

No matter which option you choose, please support jaguars on International Jaguar Day and Giving Tuesday! That support doesn’t have to be monetary, either: you can also tell your friends and families about how awesome jaguars are, because enthusiasm is contagious.

Once again, thank you WCS and Jaguar USA for caring about jaguars!

4 Thoughts

    1. I completely agree! Jaguars aren’t just beautiful, either: as top predators, they play crucial roles in helping to maintain healthy ecosystems. That’s why jaguars are considered to be “keystone species” in many of the regions they inhabit (the same goes for creatures like wolves in the US).

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Hi Josh…As I’m sure you know, jaguars were exalted in the mythologies of Latin America’s great ancient civilizations, particularly the Maya. These majestic creatures deserve our respect and protection and enrich our lives by their very existence. Thanks for speaking out about their plight in the wild.

    Liked by 1 person

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